High blood pressure related to dementia in women High blood pressure related to dementia in women

High blood pressure related to dementia in women

For her 20 October, 2017 Isabel Vallejo


According to a study, women that develop high blood pressure in their 40s may be more vulnerable to having dementia later in their lives.

According to Paola Gilsanz from the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research in Oakland, these new findings suggest that high blood pressure can start playing a role in brain health even earlier than previously thought.

The analysis reviewed the records of more than 5,600 patients, tracking them from 1996 onward for an average of 15 years to see who developed dementia. Related article: Preventing dementia: Take action before it’s too late.

The study, published in the journal Neurology, found that women who experienced high blood pressure between ages 40 and 49 are at a greater risk of developing dementia, even after the researchers took other factors into consideration such as smoking, diabetes and being overweight. Also read: Dementia: When the brain loses its ability to function properly

Men, on the other hand, did not demonstrate any age-related risk, which may be related to the fact that they are more likely to pass away before entering old age, a phase at which point the risk of developing dementia increases.